Impact: one student’s take on Anabaptist advocacy

A few weeks ago we were privileged to have two students from Christopher Dock Mennonite High School in Lansdale, Pa. visit us. Katie Gingerich and Michael Gunden both spent several shadowing our staff here to learn more about our work and how it might affect their future career choices.  Katie offered these reflections on her time with us:

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Gingerich

The one word that best describes my week at the MCC Washington office is impact. I have always been motivated by positive productivity—tasks that are designed to help others. In Washington, DC, I have met an amazing group of people committed to making an impact. These people stay resilient and passionate about fighting for their causes, despite the hopelessness some might feel when faced with these issues and the obstacles that come before resolving them.

MCC Washington’s small staff provides them with opportunities to work with other advocacy groups around Capitol Hill. I got to sit in on a couple working group meetings and conference calls, and one of the factors that stood out to me was the incredible joint effort and collaboration that was evident in these coalitions. Advocacy groups that came from different religious backgrounds and focuses could come together to make changes on immigration policy or foreign relations in Haiti. The devotion to serving those in need and making an impact through partnership was a great model for the rest of the world.

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Gunden

Part of the reason that I decided to shadow at MCC DC for my senior experience was to learn more about the work of an advocacy office. I know that I am interested in politics; in international relations; in America’s government. I wanted to explore what it would be like to work in an actual career in these fields. Being at the MCC office has taught me that I love being in an environment with effective collaboration and passion, and most of all, impact.

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