Lectionary Reflection, March 3, 2013

February 22, 2013
Melissa Engle/MCC

Melissa Engle/MCC

Paul Heidebrecht, of the Ottawa office reflects on the lectionary passages for March 3.

At first glance, this week’s biblical texts provide encouragement for this kind of personal quest. The prophet Isaiah invites us to “seek the Lord while he may be found” and “call upon him while he is near” (55:6). The Psalmist addresses God with the words: “my soul thirsts for you; my flesh faints for you, as in a dry and weary land where there is no water” (63:1). And the Gospel of Luke includes the parable of the barren fig tree, which is introduced with Jesus’ repeated urging that “unless you repent, you will all perish” (13:3 and 5).

Read the entire reflection here.


Lectionary reflection February 24, 2013 (Second Sunday of Lent)

February 13, 2013
Melissa Engle/MCC

Melissa Engle/MCC

Rachelle Lyndaker Schlabach reflects on the lectionary passages for the second Sunday of Lent.

Again and again, Jesus says, he longed to gather Jerusalem’s children “as a hen gathers her brood under her wings,” echoing the parental care expressed by Yahweh throughout the Hebrew scriptures (see, for example, Deuteronomy 32:10-11). God loves steadfastly and offers opportunities to repent and follow the path that leads to life. But God also allows the choice to follow or not to follow.

Read the entire reflection here.


Lectionary reflection February 17, 2013

February 8, 2013
Melissa Engle/MCC

Melissa Engle/MCC

Jesse Epp-Fransen reflects on the lectionary passages for February 17.

Psalm 91 is written to those who “live in the shadow of the Almighty” (Psalm 91:1). We who walk the path to Calvary today do so in the shadow of the Almighty, walking a path that Christ has walked before us.

Read the entire reflection here.


January 20, 2013 lectionary reflection

January 7, 2013
Melissa Engle/MCC

Melissa Engle/MCC

Rachelle Lyndaker Schlabach reflects on gifts in the latest lectionary reflection.

In chapter 12, Paul points out that the Corinthians need to value the many different gifts they have been given—wisdom, knowledge, faith, healing, miracles, prophecy, discernment of spirits, tongues and the interpretation of tongues. These gifts are given to individuals but are to be used to build up “the common good” (1 Corinthians 12:7).

Read the entire reflection here.

 


December 23, 2012 Lectionary reflection

December 14, 2012
Melissa Engle/MCC

Melissa Engle/MCC

Jesse Epp-Fransen responds to the lectionary passages for the fourth Sunday of Advent.

God’s plan is not for a ruler like the Assyrians who conquer by force, but that does not remove the political nature of this plan. God’s work is concerned with rulers and thrones, with hunger and wealth. God is not merely above our earthly concerns, but comes to live with us, to address the injustices of this world, to show us a way of being that undoes injustice and violence and addresses the grievances of the Psalmist who cries out “How long, LORD God Almighty, will your anger smolder against the prayers of your people?” (Psalm 80:4). The Psalmist cries out for communal salvation, for national salvation, for worldly salvation. The Psalmist cries out for the Lord’s might to awaken (Psalm 80:2) and God responds, with a child.

Read the entire reflection here.


December 16, 2012 lectionary reflection

December 12, 2012
Melissa Engle/MCC

Melissa Engle/MCC

Monica Scheifele of the Ottawa office reflects on the unexpected good news of the third advent lectionary passages.

The good news doesn’t end there. In all four passages there are references to the presence of the Lord. The Lord is coming, is near, or in our midst. No one listening to John likely imagined that the Messiah’s arrival was so close at hand or would happen in such a humble setting, but it did. God is present with us and change is not only possible, but it is happening in unexpected ways. Individual hearts and minds can experience positive change which means the world also can be changed.

Read the entire reflection here.


December 2, 2012 Lectionary reflection

November 20, 2012

Melissa Engle/MCC

Rachelle Lyndaker Schlabach reflects on the lectionary passages for the first Sunday of Advent.

Driven by our commercial society, it is easy to turn Advent into a month-long celebration of Christmas, filled with feel-good images of holly wreaths, cherubic angels and a sweet baby Jesus.

Why, then, does this Gospel text appear here, with all of its uncomfortable images of “fear and foreboding” and “praying that you may have the strength to escape all these things that will take place” (Luke 21:26, 36)?

Read the entire  reflection here.


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