Essay contest winner explores ways to address global hunger

March 28, 2014
Adam Krahn, a senior at Bethany Christian Schools in Goshen, Ind., earned grand prize for his essay on global hunger in the MCC U.S. Washington Office annual essay contest. (Photo courtesy of Bethany Christian Schools)

Adam Krahn, a senior at Bethany Christian Schools in Goshen, Ind., earned grand prize for his essay on global hunger in the MCC U.S. Washington Office annual essay contest. (Photo courtesy of Bethany Christian Schools)

Adam Krahn, a senior at Bethany Christian Schools in Goshen, Ind., has earned grand prize for his essay on global hunger in the Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) U.S. Washington Office annual essay contest.

In his essay entitled “Effectively easing global hunger,” Krahn analyzed the administration and effectiveness of U.S. international food aid. Krahn also described the role of nongovernmental organizations in eliminating global hunger and called for increased support of economic development and peacebuilding abroad.

Referring to the difficulty in reforming food aid in ways that benefit local economies rather than U.S. corporations, Krahn wrote, “As a nation, it seems our allegiance to capitalism trumped our better judgment. … U.S. food aid does help a large number of people avoid starvation. … But a supplementary program should be created to cover its shortfalls. … More specifically, the program would use funds raised in the U.S. to not only feed the hungry, but strengthen local economies and promote agricultural growth through local food purchases and education programs for farmers.”

Krahn’s home congregation is Yellow Creek Mennonite Church, Goshen.

In addition to the grand prize, national honorable mention prizes were awarded to Gabriel Eisenbeis of Freeman (S.D.) Academy, and Katie Hurst and Kinza Yoder, both of Bethany Christian Schools. Eisenbeis examined the topic of global hunger, Hurst focused on creating justice for the people of Haiti and Yoder wrote about addressing mass incarceration in the U.S. through the lens of restorative justice.

The essay contest highlights the perspectives of youth on significant public policy issues and promotes the involvement of young people in faithful witness to government authorities.

The annual contest is open to Anabaptist youth of high school age and to all youth who attend Mennonite high schools. Entries are judged on the participants’ understanding of the issues, clarity of argument and degree of creativity in crafting thoughtful policy positions. Grand prize is $300, and honorable mention winners each receive $100.


Seeking justice and mercy in sentencing reform

February 25, 2014

Agnes Chen writes about the recent passing of the Smarter Sentencing Act (S. 1410) through the Senate Judiciary Committee.

From drug possession to sexual assault, the ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach of mandatory minimum sentences does not serve justice to all the complexities involved in a harm or crime. It is time to call on Congress to remove all mandatory minimum sentences, to render justice where it is due but also compassion where it is needed.

Read the latest Third Way Cafe article here.


Restorative Justice Gathering 2013

November 25, 2013

RJ Participants 2013

On November 19-20, 2013, restorative justice practitioners gathered at Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary (AMBS) in Elkhart, Ind. While many of them are working in faith-based capacities, the gathering welcomed all restorative justice practitioners to attend. During this gathering, participants heard from one another, received reports on the Cell Blocks & Border Stops and the National Restorative Justice conferences, visited the Center for Community Justice (CCJ), and discussed ways to implement restorative justice in educational settings and advocate for criminal justice reforms.

Many thanks to Lorraine Stutzman Amstutz, Restorative Justice Coordinator of MCC U.S., for coordinating this event, to CCJ and AMBS for hosting, and to all participants who contributed to its success!


Reforming the U.S. criminal justice system

November 4, 2013

Agnes Chen writes about U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder’s announcements to reduce the use of mandatory minimum sentences in the latest Peace Signs.

As followers of Christ, these policy changes bear great significance. There has been much to lament – for the 100,026 individuals currently held behind U.S. federal bars for drug offense charges, over half of whom are subject to a mandatory minimum sentence, including those with little or no criminal record.

Read the article here.


2012-2013 High school essay contest: Honorable mention

March 28, 2013

On page 169 of Kyle Cassidy’s Armed America, a photography book filled with Americans proudly displaying firearms, Paul and Beth—no last name given—sit with their two children and three guns on a living room sofa. Smiling, they appear to be a picturesque family, and the deadliness of Paul’s Bersa .380, held only inches away from his infant son Gavin, fazes no one. In the photo’s caption, Beth responds to the photographer’s question, “Why do you own a gun?” stating that she “was raised to never rely on anyone else to protect [her] or watch [her] back.” It is obvious that Paul and Beth’s guns give them a feeling of security.

Like many Americans, Paul and Beth’s firearms are essentially members of their family, protecting their vulnerable children from outside forces much like guard dogs. It is no wonder, then, that so many citizens become immediately defensive upon mention of gun control. Terrified of what others may do to them, they clamor for protection. Americans certainly have a problem with firearms, but it is clear that the true problem is the fear that necessitates those weapons…

As followers of Christ, what are we to do in a world that fears instead of loves? The road to recovering from this social disease will be long, but it must start with the renewal of trust from person to person. Our actions do not have to be revolutionary: instead of locking our doors and keeping others out, we can take time to learn about our neighbors and invite people from our communities into our homes. We can choose to believe that trusting others is not naïve, but necessary to our collective social health.

– Excerpted from “The deadliest American family member” by Lea Graber, Freeman Academy (Freeman, South Dakota), Grade 12.


Pres. Obama signs VAWA

March 8, 2013
President Barack Obama speaks about the  importance of expanding the protections of the Violence Against Women Act. He is joined on stage by politicians, women's rights activists, and native american rights activists. This signing of the Violence Against Women Act into law took place on March 7, 2013. (Photo Jesse Epp-Fransen/MCC)

President Barack Obama speaks about the importance of expanding the protections of the Violence Against Women Act. He is joined on stage by politicians, women’s rights activists, and Native American rights activists. This signing of the Violence Against Women Act into law took place on March 7, 2013. (Photo Jesse Epp-Fransen/MCC)

On March 7, 2013 President Barack Obama signed the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) into law. This is legislation, originally crafted nearly twenty years ago to address issues of domestic violence and rape.

VAWA has traditionally been passed with bipartisan support but upon expiration during the last congress it failed to be renewed. The act is essential in providing funding for the domestic abuse hotline that has provided emergency assistance for 2 million women since its creation. The act also funds a network of shelters so that survivors of domestic abuse are not forced to choose between safety and shelter. This aspect is being expanded in the current legislation to include housing assistance to help persons leaving violent homes to be able to transition from shelters to more stable housing.

Two significant expansions in this iteration of the legislation include a non-discrimination clause based on sexual orientation. This clause asserts that services will be available to those in need regardless of the orientation of the survivor, thus protecting women and men in same sex relationships from being barred from utilizing services because of their orientation.

The second significant change is that tribal courts have been given authority to prosecute perpetrators of domestic violence and sexual assault that occur on tribal lands in the case where the perpetrator is not Native American. This closes a gaping loophole in which non-native persons were accountable to neither the tribal court nor the local municipal or state police because of issues of jurisdiction and sovereignty. Native American’s have suffered a much higher rate of sexual assault than the general public and 70% of the perpetrators are non-Native. Cases that have in the passed involved a question of jurisdiction have had a significantly lower likelihood of prosecution, when compared to crimes committed against other people of color or white victims.

This change in legislation is an incredibly important step in addressing domestic violence, but as with so many issues legislation can play only so much of a role. Along with changes in policy there must be changes in perception and changes of the heart. Visit the Fear not: Seek peace in our homes to find MCC resources on domestic violence including information on abuse  prevention and response as well as “Created Equal: Women and Men in the image of God,” a biblical reflection on creation and gender.


Massacre of innocents

January 22, 2013

Jesse Epp-Fransen reflects on the massacre of innocents in light of the current political debate concerning gun  violence.

The story of the Massacre of the Innocents in Matthew seems out of place in a story of good news and glad tidings. During the Christmas season, when we celebrate the coming of the Lord with angels and shepherds and kings, this tale of infanticide is shocking and upsetting.

Yet this past Christmas, the national coverage of the Newtown, Conn., shooting made this story terribly fitting.

Matt. 2:16-18, the only account of the massacre, reads: “When Herod saw that he had been tricked by the wise men, he was infuriated, and he sent and killed all the children in and around Bethlehem who were two years old or under, according to the time that he had learned from the wise men.

Read the entire article here.


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